// arthitectural / Concept & Competition / Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center

Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center

Concept & Competition Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center

Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City CenterThe design is based on a dynamic field strategy which organizes the new city centre’s program along a gradient of circular and elliptical patterns. A fluid field emerges from the underlying matrix in a series of larger tower extrusions towards the site’s perimeter and intermediate scale pavilion-like strctures  surrounding the cultural plaza adjacent to an existing decommissioned power station.

Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center

Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center
 
 
Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center
 
Zaha Hadid Architects | Bratislava City Center
 
Location: Bratislava, Slovakia
Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects
Year: 2010 – 2013
Gross floor area: 150,000 sqmm2
Offices: 66,550 sqm
Housing: 69, 805 sqm
Cultural: 5,000 sqm
Height of tower: 115m
GFA (above ground ): 43, 560 m² (29 floors)
GFA (underground): 15, 945 m² (2 floors)
Office space: 34,  568 m²
Restaurant: 1, 327 m²
Retail: 1, 084 m²
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  • ir Johan Ayiter

    I hope that this beautiful new city may get a further level of design thought, maybe fully based on the same structural- basic construction concept but with much more diversity in its expressif-language than only two types of towers depicting all mainly the same “bird-cage” buildings which may look very fresh and inventive/new at the beginning, but in some years time when as normal, everything turns grey and old this all will become very common-ground, and even dull, therefore I think that some structural “interconnection of the elements” should be thought about, also to protect the user/inhabitants against the elements, in summer and winter time and to make a much more interesting “Total-city” where the individual buildings may be further connected all together in a structural and abstract-natural playful way, with picks and lows etc…

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