// arthitectural / Architecture / Arno Matis Architecture | New South Cambie “Gateway”

Arno Matis Architecture | New South Cambie “Gateway”

Architecture ArnoMatisArchitecture_SouthCreekLanding1

A sweeping, spiraled building vocabulary designed to maximize floorplate efficacy, and symbolically capture energy created by the adjacent bridge ramps.

underconstruction_1Checkout Vancouver’s newest gem; South Creek Landing. Designed by Arno Matis Architecture, this innovative, transit-oriented edifice located at the southwestern foot of the Cambie bridge may soon become the symbolic gateway to Vancity’s uptown. A rare opportunity on a once-forgotten site, the commercial/residential mixed use project presents an avant-garde building form of cascading post-tensioned concrete cantilever floors and a layered screen façade that reflects light and distorts the boundaries between interior and exterior. This project boasts a number of design “firsts” for the architectural typology. The dynamic free-form steel spandrels emphasize the vortex energy of the bridgehead site. The light reflecting color was chosen to increase light penetration to the interior on overcast days typical in Vancouver. Spandrels are shaped and engineered to maximize passive solar shading.

This iconic project perched on the southwest end of the Cambie Street Bridge, may soon become the symbolic gateway to Vancouver’s uptown.

ArnoMatisArchitecture_SouthCreekLanding7DYNAMIC: Building vocabulary is sweeping and spiraled to capture the energy created by the adjacent bridge ramps. Edges are curved and fragmented to evoke the idea of movement, as if the energy of the street itself is pealing the surfaces of the building apart. The building turns its corners in prow-like forms that track sun- angles and provide passive horizontal and vertical sun-shading.

ArnoMatisArchitecture_SouthCreekLanding5RESPONSIVE: Arno Matis Architecture used its proprietary ‘REsponsive’ design approach to address the complex architectural and urban design challenges on this tight and oddly shaped site. Using site analytics to uncover cultural, social and economic forces impacting the site, South Creek Landing’s acts as a design ‘response’ to these external forces; intricately sculpted massing maximizes buildable square footage; landscaping & retail activate the pedestrian realm; a once-forgotten lot brings new life to Cambie’s skyline inviting neighboring sky train commuters to slip along its plains.

ArnoMatisArchitecture_SouthCreekLanding2VORTEX FAÇADE: Bent by the vortex energy of the bridgehead infrastructure at its location, the form of the 6th & Cambie project organically rotates to respond to light and views. Its setback and landscaped street edges facilitate pedestrian movement to the adjacent transit station. Part vertical solar shade and part privacy screen, the custom curving spandrels of the project are precisely defined and angled to respond to the solar exposure of the site. The building form is emphasized through a light art installation by Tamar Frank that recalls the frenetic movement of head and taillights. Building materials are architectural concrete, metal and glass, a deliberately spare and timeless material palette to express a homogenous yet dynamic form.

Location: Cambie bridge, Vancouver, British Columbia
Architect: Arno Matis Architecture
Client: Portliving
GFA: 2255 cu m
GV: 26,902 cu m
Site area: 643.73 sq m
Footprint area: 398.83 sq m
Building height: 20.8 m
 
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