// arthitectural / Objects / KPM Berlin re-launches Trude Petri’s modern classic MANTILLE vase

KPM Berlin re-launches Trude Petri’s modern classic MANTILLE vase

Objects KPM_Vase Mantille_Trude Petri 1957_Neuauflage_PREIS

With the re-edition of the organically shaped MANTILLE vase, KPM Berlin revives one of the most beautiful works of the manufactory’s famous designer Trude Petri. Trude Petri’s vase MANTILLE, first launched in 1957, resembles an elegant sculpture. The sweeping lines refer to the experimental designs of the 1950s. The waist-like shape conveys the impression of movement and seems to emulate the ideal of femininity in the 1950s. The hourglass silhouette of Christian Dior’s New Look and Cristóbal Balenciaga’s evening wear, which was influenced by a contemporary flamenco style, may have influenced the design. Even the name MANTILLE may allude to this source of inspiration. In Spain, the “Mantilla” is a veil or scarf, which covers head and shoulders.

The relief of the vase, made out of velvety bisque porcelain, delights with its intricate design in contrast to the glazed surface of the vase’s body. The balanced proportions construct a coherent and overall harmonious image blurring the boundaries between sculpture and vase.

Throughout its entire history, KPM Berlin has collaborated with major artists and designers. In the first half of the 20th century, the manufacture was one of the pioneers of a new design language. The avant-garde program of KPM Berlin is ultimately represented by one name: Trude Petri (1906-1996). Her dinner service URBINO, created in 1931, has become an icon of Modernism. The clear lines were inspired by the designs of Bauhaus and East Asian porcelain.

Due to its perfect symbiosis between form and function, the service received the Grand Prix at the Paris World Exhibition in 1937 and became part of the permanent collec-tion of the New York Museum of Modern Art. After moving to the United States in 1949, the successful designer continued to create new shapes for the manufacture. In her late work, she incorporated, in a playful way, sculptural elements into her designs, without neglecting the function. The artistic and aesthetic quality of her timeless work still fascinates people to-day.

In 1763, King Frederick II. of Prussia (1712-1786) purchased the porcelain manufactory from the Berlin merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky. Today, the manufactory is one of Berlin’s oldest craftsman’s establishments. Since 2006, the Berlin banker Jörg Woltmann is the sole shareholder of KPM Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Berlin GmbH (KPM Berlin). 170 employees are working for this traditional company. In addition to the flagship store at the KPM QUARTIER, KPM Berlin has six sales galleries in Germany and is working at national and international level with selected trading partners. KURLAND, which was created in the classical style around 1790, and URBINO from the Bauhaus era rank among KPM Berlin’s bestsellers.

Designer: KPM Berlin
 
 
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