// arthitectural / Architecture / Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

Architecture Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging GardenWhat goes inside the mind of an architect when faced with a challenge task of processing a steep cliff with an inclination off almost 45°, enveloped in lush vegetation with a trickling river beneath it and an ancient temple sitting nearby? Popo Danes magically transformed it into Ubud Hanging Garden, a Resort Hotel & Spa with 40 units of villa.

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

The based structure of the foundation is unproductive and step sedimentary rocks, creating such a condition that forced the architect to place each unit of building in a somewhat “floating” position. This position employs a raised platform, with floors not touching the grounds to provide space for the land to absorb water and therefore is able to “breathe” better.

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

This is in line with the designing mission to preserve the characteristics of the site and to optimally maintain the pristine natural condition of its locality. A traditional Balinese layout is also adapted by fronting the courtyards as central space, which is known as natah in the Balinese language.

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

Beside the contour challenges, the design is also expected to represent the traditional Balinese architectural contents while at the same time catering for a commercial aspect, which also serves as a strong designing principle. The architect approached this challenge by creating a traditional frontage (with locally-sourced materials) showcased in a modern aesthetics (found in the facilities and layout). This is seen in the use of Merbau timber on the inside floorings as well as Bengkirai timber on the deck, not to mention the thatched roofs.

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

Popo Danes Architect | Ubud Hanging Garden

© Sony Sandjaya

With the size of +100 m² per unit, this resort is expected to give birth to a most advantageous combination of indoor and outdoor space. Although in reality the outdoor space outsize the indoor one, it has a clear value and balances out the hotel capacity. The indoor space is used as a bedroom, featuring typical Balinese bed and bathroom, whereas the bigger outdoor space serves as a deck, a bigger plunge pool, and a bale to fulfill the standard measurements of the tourism industry. The vertically-inclined circulation is tackled with the use of an inclinator, a solution which utilizes an environmentally friendly system.

Location: Ubud, Bali, Indonesia
Architect: Popo Danes Architect
Design principals: Popo Danes
Design period: 2003
Construction period: 2003-2006
Owner: PT Sanjiwani
Site area: 34,144.9 sqm
Floor area: 7,388.6 sqm
Total room keys: 40 Room Keys
Room keys:
Panoramic deluxe pool villa: 19 Room Keys
Riverside deluxe pool villa: 19 Room Keys
Duplex family pool villa: 1 Room Keys
Owner compound: 1 Room Keys
Project name: Ubud Hanging Gardens Resort
Type of buildings: Resort
Photos: Sony Sandjaya
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