// arthitectural / Interiors / Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro Loft

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro Loft

Interiors Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro Loft

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro LoftThis project involved the radical transformation of a tiny, awkward apartment at the top of a six-story building. With only 425 square feet (39.5 square meters) of floor area, but a ceiling height of over 24 feet (7.3 meters), the new design exploits the inherent sectional possibilities, and creates a flowing interior landscape that dissolves the notion of distinct “rooms.”

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro Loft

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro LoftThe architectural strategy creates four “living platforms” that accommodate everything necessary, while still allowing the apartment to feel open and bright. The spaces are interleaved, with a cantilevered bed that hovers out over the main living space, an ultra-compact bath tucked beneath the stair, and a roof garden with glazing that allows light to cascade through the space.

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro Loft

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro Loft

Specht Harpman Architects | Manhattan Micro LoftEvery inch is put to use, with stairs featuring built-in storage units below, similar to Japanese kaidan dansu. The apartment is crafted like a piece of furniture, with hidden and transforming spaces for things and people.

Location: New York, USA
Architect: Specht Harpman Architects
Project category: Residential Renovation
Project size: 425 sq. ft.
Completion date: 2012
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