// arthitectural / Interiors / Vertical Garden Design | Natura Tower

Vertical Garden Design | Natura Tower

Interiors NT-EXTERIOR-1

Exterior: This garden wraps around three sides of the square, facing south, east and north. The surface has several openings, doors and shop windows, and goes along two sets of stairs that connect the square with the upper- and lower levels. These openings and irregularities creates an interesting surface as it integrates several functions and invites the visitors to come close.
The north facing wall enjoys a protected location with no direct sunlight at all. It hosts a variety of ferns from genera as Asplenium, Athyrium, Pteris and Polystichum, and many broad leaved species like different Begonia, Pilea, and Arum. There are also contrasting fields with thin, linear leafed plants – like Iris japonica and some varieties of Chlorophytum comosum. Together, these different areas create a moist, woodland character with an additional tropical touch brought by a few solitary, larger exotic plants, like Philodendron bipinnatifidum, Platycerium bifurcatum and Monstera deliciosa.

For a large part of the day, the south facing wall is shadowed by one of the buildings, but still, the sun exposure creates significantly different growing conditions. Unlike the other walls where most plants have rather modest flowering, this wall is more colorful, for example species of  Ceanothus, Geranium, Fuchsia, Bergenia, Cuphea, Heuchera, Lantana, Pelargonium and Campanula. There is also some areas with grass- or grasslike plants. The intention is to create small, light, moving grass-fields framing some of the openings. As a total there are approximately 300 species.

Interior: In the main entrance of the new MSF office, the garden is split in two, divided by a waterfall over black slate. The base  consists of some common species of Philodendron, Scindapsus, Pteris, Peperomia and Davallia. The tropical touch given by the waterfall is emphasized by plants from the Araceae family that are less usual to find in European nurseries, among others: Philodendron ‘Burle Marx’, Philodendron giganteum and Anthurium Veitchii. A few of these will potentially grow quite big as the years go by, developing mature leafs that are very different from the juvenile character. Some species of Begonia, Asparagus, and Pteris can be found both in the indoor and outdoor garden.

Location: Lisbon, Portugal
Architect: GJP arquitectos
Landscape Architect: Michael Hellgren – Vertical Garden Design
Year: 2009

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