// arthitectural / Lighting / Zaha Hadid Architects | VORTEXX Chandelier

Zaha Hadid Architects | VORTEXX Chandelier

Lighting Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

Courtesy of Zumtobel LightingThe design language explored in the vortex is in line with a series of furniture pieces realized in collaboration with Sawaya & Moroni. Fluidity and seamlessness are conceptual terms that best describe the appearance of this 1,8m wide and 0,8m high chandelier. Its complex curvilinearity follows a double helix connecting its beginning to its end and therefore forming an endless ribbon of light. In plan the object resembles a star with its protrusions pointing outwards from the center, emphasizing an imaginary centrifugal force.

Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

Two transparent acrylic light spirals are inscribed in the chandelier’s otherwise opaque surface. A recessed LED light strip provides animated and programmable light sensations. Direct as well as indirect light can optionally be emitted to the environment. Consequently different lighting atmospheres may be created by the user in order to match the specific space in which the chandelier is installed.

Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

Courtesy of Zumtobel Lighting

This new interior design language is fuelled by advanced digital design possibilities and manufacturing methods such as CNC-milling and 3D printing. The user is invited to creatively explore its interactive qualities and respond to its unfamiliar aesthetics.

Architect: Zaha Hadid and Patrik Schumacher
Design Team:
Thomas Vietzke
Partners:
Zumtobel & Staff, Sawaya & Moroni
Client:
Sawaya & Moroni
Size:
1.8 m in diameter
Material:
Fiberglas, Car Paint, Acrylic, LED
Date:
2005
Created in:
London, Uk

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