// arthitectural / Architecture / Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Architecture Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Design Concept : NAUTICAL LINES

Nestled on a small waterfront plot in Sentosa Cove, the brief for this house was to create an eco-friendly home that is sensitive to its context yet has a ‘wow’ factor. A Nautical theme was chosen to drive the design and form of the house, evoking images of sailboats, the ocean, waves and movement. The envelope of the house is a sinuous wave form with wide overhangs that provide shading for the hot Eastern and Western sun, and opens up to the North and South. The underside of the ceiling is clad in recycled teak, reminiscent of a boat hull. Extensive Low-e glazing affords views of the waterway to the North and South China Sea to the South. Large Sliding glass doors can be opened to allow cool sea breezes to flow through the spaces, lessening the reliance on air conditioning. Where there is no view of the ocean, the walls and built in elements of the spaces are curved to give a constant reminder of the seafront context of the home. For example, the Master Bathroom walls are flowing curves with a shaded skylight over to afford views of the sky and curved roof above. The walls floor and ceiling of the bathroom form a sinuous curved envelope clad with stainless steel, and all bathroom fixtures including basins, wc’s and shower fittings echo this fluid curvaceous nautical theme.

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove WayDesign Approach: We were engaged to design a home for the owner’s family and their lifestyle. The design approach was very much a holistic one, integrating architecture, landscape, and built in interior elements. It was a privilege to co-ordinate the design of all aspects of this project. The consultants were engaged by us, allowing active synergy between the project team, and a single point co-ordination contact for the owner.

Materials & Finishes: The primary structure of the house is Reinforced Concrete and Steel. The nautical theme is enhanced with the use of natural teak for ceilings and floors, and clean curvaceous lines for built-in elements in the house. Natural materials are used wherever possible.

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove WayKey Elements of the Design

Roof Form The roof form was conceived of as a sinuous wave form that not only echoes the nautical theme, but maximizes the useable space to comply with the URA Attic Guidelines. Formed from factory bent steel I-beams, we wanted to keep the roof very thin in elevation, but maintain a layer of aluminium battens on top for aesthetics and to provide shading for the metal roof below. Much care and attention was paid in detailing the structural and architectural elements of this roof form. The underside of the roof is clad with bleached teak, reminiscent of a boat hull.

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove WayBuilt in Elements: The Kitchen island counter was designed to echo the curved roof form of the house. Similarly, the Master Bathroom walls are flowing curves with a shaded skylight over to afford views of the sky and curved roof above. The walls floor and ceiling of the bathroom form a sinuous curved envelope clad with stainless steel, and all bathroom fixtures including basins, wc’s and shower fittings echo this fluid curvaceous nautical theme.

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove WayAttributes of a Sustainable Built Environment

1. Resilience to Climate Change

Passive cooling enhanced by large sliding glass doors that open to allow good natural cross ventilation, orientation of glazing to the North and South, vertical and horizontal shading to minimize the need for air conditioning. Use of recycled timber externally for decking rather than stone to reduce heat gain.

2. Resource

Efficacy Passive cooling of spaces as mentioned in 3. above.

3. Longevity = Adaptability + Re-Use

Recycled and Recyclable materials used such as timber, steel.

4. Harmonization with Place

Use of tropical natural materials, with wide eaves and large overhangs and vertical shading to keep the house cool. Integration of landscaping, Roof Gardens and Ponds to keep all spaces in touch with the natural environment.

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way

Greg Shand Architects | 36 Cove Way5. Wellness of the Inhabitant

The house was designed specifically for the owner’s lifestyle, needs and requirements. Good natural cross ventilation, views to the garden and waterway & sea beyond, use of natural materials and good shading provide for a comfortable, healthy space for the owner. The owners are extremely happy with the house, exceeding their expectations.

6. Integration of Landscape

Integration of landscaping and ponds and views out from all rooms keep all spaces in touch with the natural environment.

7. Design Process 

Single designer to oversee all aspects of architecture, landscape and interior design. Active synergy between Architect, Engineers, Contractors and Owner.

Location: No.36 Cove Way, Sentosa Cove, Singapore
Architect: Greg Shand Architects | Robert Greg Shand
Design Year: 2008
Site Area: Plot size 630.40 sqm. GFA = 504.30 sqm.
Description: A 2-storey Bunglow House with Basement, 5-Bedrooms, Multimedia Room, Attic and Swimming Pool
Planning Constraints: Plot Ratio 0.80. Maximum Height Control 11.7m from existing entrance driveway level
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